Leaders; Sue Williams and Mel Stockdale Walkers; Jill and Andy MacFarlane, John Hamlin, Glynis Holmes, Laurie Hutchinson, Ian Pickering. Only   seasoned   walkers   would   have   turned   out   on   such   an   unpromising   foggy,   damp   morning.   We   set   off   from   Morley   hoping that   the   fog   would   lift   by   the   time   we   parked   the   cars   at   Hetton   but   it   was   not   to   be.   The   leaders   set   off   up   the   walled   tracks   of   the Dales   High   Way   and   Cross   Lane   at   a   cracking   pace   -with   visibility   so   poor   there   were   no   distractions.   We   had   to   imagine   the views   over   to   Ingleborough   as   we   navigated   the   large   field   towards   Long   Hill   and   it   was   difficult   to   persuade   Laurie   that Winterburn reservoir even existed. Some of us were in more of a fog than others! It   was   unseasonably   warm   as   we   slogged   blindly   up   to   Weets   top   causing   some   disrobing   stops.   At   least   we   saw   the   trig   point and Ian was able to add the photo to his collection. A   breeze   started   to   clear   some   of   the   mist   at   last   as   we   stopped   for   lunch   under   Sue’s   windswept   umbrella   trees   and   snatches   of scenery appeared. Unfortunately this also lowered the temperature so all the gear went back on. By   the   time   we   passed   Know   Bank   there   were   even   some   hints   of   blue   sky.   On   the   way   back   down   the   tracks   it   was   possible   to appreciate some of the incredible landscape and much to the leaders relief, Winterburn was where it was supposed to be. We all agreed that this walk needs to be done again in better weather to reveal its full glories.

Walk Report for January 8th 2017

The Short Walk – Sunday 19 February 2017

Leader – Lizzie Lowe Walkers   –   Julie   Jowett   (returning   after   long   absence),   Colin   and   Alison   Mortimer   (potential   new   members),   Denise   Robson, Sonia,   Jenny,   David   Lyon,   Jonathan,   Pat   Ashby,   Hazel   Marshall   and   her   dog,   Pat   Pitts,   Pat   and   Graham   Smith,   Bev,   Robin, David Shaw, Lesley, Val Chadwick, Beryl, Rita and Brian, Gavin, Pauline, Terry Doolan, Bill and Hazel Location – Pudsey Weather – mild for the time of year, and mostly dry The   walk   began   in   School   Street,   Pudsey.         We   meandered   through   back   alleys   and   quiet   suburban   streets,   across   Queens   Park then   onto   Owlcotes   Lane.         This   led   us   downwards,   across   muddy   fields   until   we   were   nearly   at   the   Ring   Road.         We   then   went upwards   again,   along   a   walled   lane,   emerging   on   a   main   road.         We   crossed,   and   went   down   Bradley   Lane,   turning   left   just before   Moorhouse   Place,   then   right   to   descend   to   Tyersal   Beck.         Here   we   found   three   donkeys   and   some   convenient   rocks   on which to sit and have elevensies. Here   we   left   suburbia   behind   us,   turning   right   to   follow   a   track   upwards   through   patchy   woodland,   eventually   arriving   at   the ancient Tyersal   Hall   at   the   top   of   the   hill.        Turning   left   here   we   followed   a   muddy   track   downwards   to   a   stream.         We   crossed   the stream   and   ascended   to   a   broad   track   (different   coloured   mud   here).         At   this   point   we   noticed   we   had   mislaid   Gavin.         After some   confusion   Bill   and   Robin   retrieved   him,   and   we   all   turned   left   along   the   track,   passing   through   Black   Carr   Woods.        Convenient   benches   provided   a   fairly   comfortable   lunch   stop.         Two   horses   were   frightened   by   us   and   nearly   threw   their   riders off – one of the riders accused us of hiding behind trees! Downwards   again   to   Pudsey   Beck,   then   over   two   bridges,   to   turn   right   along   a   beckside   path.        A   sharp   left   to   go   up   a   steep   track to   the   Bankhouse   Inn;   another   left   along   a   track   just   before   the   pub   car   park,   then   a   right,   to   a   path   upwards   across   a   field.        Through   a   remarkably   narrow   gap   stile   into   a   narrow   ginnel   -   this   led   us   downhill,   to   regain   the   streets   of   Pudsey.        A   few   more ginnels and we were back the other end of School Street – all fairly tired after the many ups and downs of this varied walk. Lizzie Lowe

Medium Walk to Bramhope 5

th

 March 2017

Leader: - Glynis Holmes. Walkers: - Pat & Graham, Pam, Bev, Jonathan, Ian, John & Sonia, Robin, Pat A. Carol and Peter met us there. We   set   off   on   a   bright   morning   from   Golden   Acre   Park.   The   first   part   of   the   walk   was   along   to   Pauls   Pond   where   the   swans   and ducks   were   being   antisocial   and   stayed   in   the   reeds   furthest   away   from   us.   This   part   of   the   walk   was   good   underfoot   so   were made swift progress to Grag Farm (The Care for Life centre) where we had our elevenses on a grassy area by the footpath. I’d   warned   the   group   that   the   going   got   very   muddy   from   here   and   Pat,   Graham   and   Pam   had   planned   to   leave   us   at   this   point and   retrace   their   steps   back   to   Golden Acre.   We’d   just   finished   our   snap   when   it   started   to   rain   so   we   said   our   fare   wells,   donned the waterproofs and carried on to Bramhope. A   Llama   gave   us   a   snooty   look   as   we   walked   past   his   field   and   onwards   through   the   old   tips   left   from   the   building   of   the   railway tunnel. We were soon at Bramhope where we sat in the park shelter as it was still raining on and off. The   rain   was   getting   heavier   and   the   cloud   was   low   so   unfortunately   we   didn’t   get   the   views   across   from   the   Ebor   way   we   had   had on   the   walk   over.   We   just   got   more   mud;   after   24hours   of   non-stop   rain   over   Friday/Saturday   the   paths   were   very   squelchy   and there was talk of me getting the trolley award. Cheek!! I   decided   to   cut   the   slurry   filled   Bank   Top   lane   out   so   we   came   down   Arthington   Road   and   joined   the   footpath   to   Lineham   Farm Donkey   Sanctuary.   We   discovered   Ian   needed   to   go   back   to   Specsavers   as   he   thought   the   donkeys   were   pigs!   The   sheep   were pigs! Everything looked like a pig! We   headed   off   down   Swan   Lane   and   along   to   Eccup   Whin   Woods   where   I   had   to   call   Pat A   back   as   she   was   heading   down   a   path in   to   a   swamp   created   by   the   very   wet   winter.   Soon   we   were   back   in   to   Golden   Acre   where   the   Canada   Geese   were   squawking and   strutting   their   stuff.   Spring   is   on   its   way   and   let’s   hope   it’s   a   dry   one.      I   was   really   tempted   to   nip   in   the   café   as   they   do   nice scones   here   but   we   did   look   like   the   creatures   from   the   black   lagoon   so   we   decided   to   head   straight   home.      We’d   walked   8.3 miles in good company, shame about the mud and the weather but that’s winter walking in Great Britain. Baa Humbug!!

The Long Walk – Sunday 12 March 2017

Location: Barwick in Elmet Leader: Lizzie Lowe Walkers: Ian, Robin, David Shaw, Sonia, Sue Williams, Andy and Jill, Melanie, Peter and Carol Weather: Unexpectedly warm and sunny The   walk   began   at   the   Black   Swan   Public   House   in   Barwick   in   Elmet.         The   weather   forecasters   had   told   us   we   would   be   cold and wet, so we were wrapped up cosily. We   began   by   walking   through   the   pub’s   car   park   and   taking   an   alleyway   that   led   us   past   ancient   earthworks   into   Meadow   View.        Passing   various   bits   of   suburbia,   we   emerged   onto   Potterton   Lane   and   then   endured   a   bit   of   road   walking   until,   after   twists   and turns, we found the A64.   Having   crossed   this   busy   road,   we   turned   right   to   find   a   stile   that   led   us   to   more   peaceful   places   –   some   fields,   then   a   long   track called   Mangrill   Lane.         This   took   us   to   the   Thorner/Bramham   Road.         We   turned   right,   and   went   downhill,   eventually   crossing   the road   to   take   a   footpath   down   to   Wothersome   Lake.         After   crossing   some   rather   unsteady   stepping   stones   over   a   stream,   we climbed to a ledge where we sat with our elevensies.   The sun was out, and we took off a layer or two of clothing. Onward   –   left,   then   after   a   mile   or   so,   right   -   we   stumbled   through   muddy   woods   on   a   variety   of   rutted   tracks.         We   reached Pompocali   in   time   for   lunch,   sitting   atop   what   are   rumoured   to   be   Roman   remains.         More   clothing   came   off;   it   was   getting actively hot! Full   of   sandwiches,   we   proceeded   past   the   ruins   of   Scarcroft   Mill,   along   a   stony   track,   then   across   a   couple   of   fields   to   reach Thorner   Lane.         Turning   left,   we   followed   the   lane   uphill   then   took   a   stile   on   the   right   into   a   field   full   of   lunching   walkers   (not   very communicative   folk   so   we   don’t   know   where   they   were   from).         We   passed   some   interesting   Georgian   houses,   then   took   an alleyway   that   became   a   lane,   crossed   some   stiles,   descending   and   ascending   muddy   tracks   and   emerging   in   Thorner   itself.        Sadly we found no ice-cream vans or shops – we really were getting very warm indeed. Uphill   out   of Thorner   -   Kirkfield   Lane   then   Ellerker   Lane,   then   Saw   Wood   –   and   we   were   back   then   playing   the   dangerous   ‘Cross the A64’   game.         We   all   survived,   and   descended   to   a   beck   which   we   followed   through   many   a   field   till   it   was   time   to   stop   for   an afternoon rest.   The beck’s waters twinkled in the sunlight – unbelievably for early March.   It   would   have   been   nice   to   finish   on   that   agreeable   track   by   the   beck,   but   alas,   we   had   another   muddy   uphill   scramble   to   get back   to   Barwick.         Very   hot   and   sweaty,   we   returned   to   our   cars   at   around   2.30pm.         Barwick’s   tearoom   and   ice-cream   shop   were firmly shut, so we headed home. The lovely weather was a real bonus – I wonder if the forecasters will apologise for getting their predictions so wrong? Lizzie Lowe

Lothersdale - Medium Walk 05/02/2017

Walkers(15).   -Ian   Pickering(Leader)   ,Lizzie,   Sue   Williams,   Glynis,   David   Shaw,   Ros,   Angela   Phipps   ,Andrew   Sanderson,   Laurie, Pat Appleyard, Maddie Burrows, Robin, John Hamlin, Phil & Cyn As   we   parked   up   in   the   Craven   village   of   Lothersdale   ,there   was   a   few   disgruntled   faces   as   all   we   could   see   was   hills.   Shortly   after setting off we were heading up one of these hills, which certainly warmed us up on a chilly morning. We   joined   the   Pennine   Way   and   continued   to   climb   steadily   to   reach   the   summit   point   of   Pinhaw   Beacon.   We   took   a   well-earned coffee   break   here   and   enjoyed   some   stunning   views   across   the   Dales,   as   well   as   been   joined   by   a   few   excitable   dogs. A   welcome downhill   stretch   was   now   encountered,   as   we   followed   the   Pennine   Way   across   Thornton   Moor.   My   warning   of   a   very   slippery boardwalk   across   a   bog   caused   some   cautious   walking,   but   as   we   reached   the   end   of   the   obstacle,   Glynis   took   a   tumble   into   the mud, luckily no harm done apart from mucky kecks.  After   strolling   through   Elslack   village,   we   headed   up   hill   to   the   nice   little   Elslack   Reservoir,   where   we   took   lunch   and   repaired Lizzie's   feet   &   boots   after   they   had   fallen   apart. A   steady   climb   through   Standrise   Plantation   gave   us   some   lovely   views   across   the Craven   dales,   before   emerging   into   a   moors   road,   where   Mrs   Applepie   came   out   of   the   woods   with   a   bright   orange   ball   she   had stolen   from   a   dog,   who   is   probably   still   looking   for   his   toy. The   last   climb   of   the   day   was   over   Ransable   Moor,   before   picking   up   the Pennine Way again back to the finish. An enjoyable, although rather tough walk in decent weather, to a rarely visited area.

Pendle Hill  (Long Walk)09/04/2017

Walkers   :-   Ian   Pickering   (Leader)   ,   Denise   Smith,   Sue   Williams,   Tonya,   Joyce   Briggs,   Glynis,   David   Shaw,   Angela   Phipps,   Jill   & Andy, Laurie , John Hamlin, Carol & President Pete. Also joining us for a while was Ian's friend & local lad Richard & his dog Alfie. Shorts   &   t-shirts   were   required   as   we   set   off   in   glorious   sunshine   from   Pendleton   Village.   Shortly   after   leaving   the   village   we   were on   the   up,   heading   towards   Nick   of   Pendle,   passing   en-route   a   Ski   Slope,   skiing   in   lovely   sunshine   didn't   seem   right,   but   it   is   a   dry run. The Nick of Pendle is a gap in the fell ridge, from where we treated to wonderful views across the Ribble Valley to Clitheroe. After   a   coffee   break,   we   continued   over   Apronfull   Hill   and   Black   Hill,   before   entering   a   lovely   little   valley   known   as   Ogden   Clough. We   now   followed   a   paved   path   across   Barley   Moor   towards   the   summit   of   Pendle   Hill,   it   was   at   this   point   Joyce   started   to   feel unwell, but Nurse Tonya gave her a magic potion, that tasted disgusting but seemed to help for a while. The   summit   was   busy   with   people,   but   we   managed   to   take   over   the   trig   point   for   group   photos,   which   looked   like   it   included several   of   the   local   Witches.   Leaving   the   windy   summit   plateau,   we   headed   downhill   &   took   lunch,   before   heading   across   Downham Moor,   where   the   weather   started   to   change   &   it   got   rather   chilly.   Joyce   had   another   dizzy   spell   &   got   cramp,   but   was   revived   after   a bit   of   treatment   &   a   sugary   drink,   which   apparently   had   been   found   on   the   fell   earlier,   nothing   but   the   best   for   our   members.   Before heading   south   along   the   valley,   we   paid   a   visit   to   the   farm   that   used   in   the   classic   film   'Whistle   down   the   wind’,   but   Jesus   wasn't   in the   barn. A   steady   trudge   back   along   the   valley   passed   a   couple   of   lovely   old   halls,   before   we   returned   to   Pendleton,   thankfully   with Joyce in one piece.

The Tea Shop Walk – Sunday 9 April 2017

Leader – Lizzie Lowe Walkers   –   Rita   and   Brian,   Graham   and   Pat   Smith,   Terry   Doolan,   Marg   Rapley,   Trish   Ashby,   Jonathan,   Brenda   Fox,   Julie   Jowett, Melanie, Sylvia Reece, Hazel Marshall, Jenny, Pauline Ford, Sonia Hamlin Weather – Very warm and sunny Location = Burley in Wharfedale An   unseasonably   hot   day   –   more   like   July   than April.         We   parked   in   the   public   car   park   on   Long   Meadow,   and   set   off   uphill   to   the railway   station.         Here   we   passed   over   a   footbridge,   then   turned   left   along   a   quiet   street   that   soon   became   a   stony   track   leading   up to   Hag   Farm.         Passing   through   the   farmyard   and   some   woods,   we   turned   right   along   a   track   leading   more   steeply   uphill.        A   stream babbled on our left as we climbed.   We paused in a field for a refreshing snack, then ever upward, to the Guisely – Ilkley road. Having   crossed   the   busy   road,   we   took   a   footpath   immediately   opposite   the   one   we’d   just   left,   then   crossed   the   stream   via   some stepping stones, to head upwards along a track that led out onto the moors. And   still   we   climbed,   till   eventually   we   reached   a   stony   path   on   a   ridge.         Here   we   turned   right,   with   some   amazing   views   to   keep   us entertained.         We   followed   the   stony   track   till   we   came   to   a   little   brick   building   resembling   a   bus   shelter.         Then   we   started   a   very gradual   descent,   past   two   farms   which   allegedly   had   distant   views   of   York   Minster   (can’t   see   how,   but   one   farm   was   actually   called York   View).        At   a   third   farm   we   turned   left   along   a   level      stony   track.         Soon   we   had   to   turn   left   again   along   an   indistinct   grassy   track that led us round a disused quarry to find a narrow track along another ridge – more fab views!   We stopped for some lunch. Onward   again.         Suddenly   the   track   descended   into   a   ravine   where   we   crossed   Coldstone   Beck   via   some   very   dodgy   stepping stones.         It   was   quite   a   scramble   up   the   steep   bank   the   other   side.         But   now   the   climbing   ended.         We   took   a   downward   trail   that led   us   through   fields   to   a   busy   road.         We   had   only   a   short   walk   beside   the   road,   then   we   turned   left   along   Stead   Lane   –   another stony   track   past   scattered   houses.        After   about   1   km,   we   turned   right   through   a   kissing   gate,   and   followed   a   green   path   along   the valley   –   it   wove   about   a   bit,   and   we   finally   joined   yet   another   stony   track   to   emerge   near   Burley   station.         We   followed   the   road down into Burley.   Hot   and   tired,   most   of   the   walkers   headed   for The   Coffee   Station   to   have   their   tea   and   buns.         Some   rebels   went   to   the   pub   instead.        And   sadly,   I   had   to   rush   home   –   the   hot   weather   and   the   hills   had   rendered   us   very   slow,   and   I   was   too   short   of   time   to   have   a   cake on my own tea shop walk.   How sad is that!!

Thixendale Medium Walk 2/4/17

Leader Angela Phipps Walkers       Mel,   Pat   Smith,   Sue   Williams,   Denise   Smith,   Margaret   Bye,   David   Lyons, Anne   Cooper,   Jill   & Andy   MacFarlane,   Pat   Pitts, Laurie, Robin, Trish Ashby, Andre & Ros In   spite   of   rain   dances   all   week   to   keep   numbers   down   for   my   first   walk,   the   weather   was   lovely   and   we   made   a   decent   sized   motley crew. We   set   off   from   the   village   hall   west   to   bear   left   onto Thixen   Dale. After   a   march   up   Milham   Dale   we   arrived   at Thixendale   Grange   at the   stoke   of   11   for   coffee.   Some   of   the   group   were   heckled   by   a   friendly   passing   chap   on   a   horse   &   cart   wanting   to   join   us   for   coffee. (So far so good) Refreshed,   we   walked   on   up   to   turn   left   onto   the   Roman   Road   on   the   North   Wolds   Walk.   Before   leaving   the   road   Pat   Pitts   was armed   with   a   copy   of   the   walk   and   intended   to   leave   us   to   cut   the   walk   short   (on   the   condition   she   saved   us   some   cake   in   the Village   Hall   coffee   shop).   Just   as   she   was   about   to   leave   us   our   eccentric   friend   with   the   horse   &   cart   was   passing,   and   offered   her a   lift   which   she   was   very   happy   to   accept.   We   took   photographic   evidence   and   waved   her   off   not   entirely   sure   if   we   would   see   her again! (One down) The   rest   of   the   group   headed   down   through   the   fields   crossing   Waterloo   Beck   and   admired   the   beautiful   mass   of   daffodils   in   the garden   of   Waterloo   Cottage.   Heading   towards   Kirby   Underdale   we   met   up   with   our   now   best   friend   and   chauffeur   who   was   keen   to tell us where he'd dropped Pat off and where she was heading. (To bag our cakes at the tea shop we hoped...) We stopped in the lovely churchyard of the old church at Kirby Underdale for lunch, and a few people explored the church. Then   it   was   time   for   the   uphill.   Passing   Painsthorpe   Hall,   Ros   was   wishing   she'd   eaten   her   apple   at   lunch   and   not   tried   to   eat   in   it en-route   while   puffing   &   panting!   We   were   also   blessed   with   the   promise   of   some   good   luck   as   a   bird   left   a   present   on   Laurie's forehead. Luckily Margaret had some wet wipes and cleaned him up. Back   at   the   Roman   Road   we   followed   Pat's   footsteps   down   Worm   Dale,   then   back   onto   Thixen   Dale   following   the   Yorkshire   Wolds Way   back   into   Thixendale   in   time   to   beat   the   black   clouds   that   lurked   menacingly.   (Ian   will   be   pleased   to   know   that   I   managed   to miss the hare and pheasant with my camera as is my want.) We were reunited with Pat Pitts in the tea shop and there was enough cake to go round. Counted them out and counted them in. (Phew!)

Peter and Carol’s 9 mile walk on Sunday 4 June 2017 from Gargrave

Present were: - Peter, Carol, Glynis, David Lyons, David Shaw, Angela, Ian, Jenny, Robin and Pat Appleyard. We   set   off   from   the   public   car   park   in   Gargrave   with   a   beautiful   Sunny   morning   to   enter   the   canal   heading   towards   Flasby.     All   went well   until   we   discovered   that   we   had   lost   David   L   who   had   gone   back   to   retrieve   the   poles   he   had   abandoned   some   way   back.     Lovely   views   were   to   be   had   of   Flasby   Fell   along   with   Rough   Haw   and   Sharp   Haw.   I   did   manage   to   get   us   all   off   track   when   Glynis wanted   a   ladies’   stop   as   we   all   followed   her   through   a   gate   which   I   said   was   the   right   way.   I’d   been   chatting   and   missed   the   turn   so I   got   some   flack   for   that!      Carol   narrated   historical   facts   at   regular   intervals   that   she   hoped   added   to   the   interest   and   I   entertained with some jokes with calls from Glynis of “not to give up my day job” The   leader’s   timing   for   coffee   stop   was   brilliant   for   as   soon   as   we   all   settled   it   tipped   it   down.      We   all   sought   shelter   under   a   large tree until it stopped, but the rest of the time it managed to kept fine. There   were   some   terrific   views   overlooking   the Aire   Valley   and   Pendle   Hill   beyond. A   pleasant   two   mile   stroll   along   the   canal   from Stirton brought us back to Gargrave and the car park.

GRASSINGTON WALK REPORT – 11.6.17

LONG WALK WITH A BIT OF A TEA SHOP!!!

LEADER: SUE WILLIAMS WALKERS: CAROL   SUMMERS,   DENISE   SMITH,   TONYA   SMITH,   ANGELA   PHIPPS,   DAVID   SHAW,   ROBIN   MYERS,   LAURIE HUTCHINSON, JOHN HAMLIN, PAT APPLEYARD On   leaving   the   Visitor   Centre   car   park,   we   headed   up   into   Grassington   itself   where   there   was   a   Farmers’   Market   taking   place   (very tempting   to   stay   put),   but   we   carried   on   regardless.      We   followed   the   Dales   Way   through   the   village   and   out   onto   the   moors.      We branched   off   from   the   Dales   Way   path   and   headed   up   to   “Bare   House”   which   is   a   derelict   farmhouse   and   was   a   good   place   to   stop for coffee. After   our   break,   we   then   headed   for   the   old   lead   mines   and   Cupola   Chimney,   which   looks   more   like   the   Leaning   Tower   of   Pisa   each time   I   see   it.      We   had   lunch   there   as   there   was   some   shelter   from   the   wind,   before   heading   down   to   Hebden   Beck.      The   beck   was quite   high   because   of   the   rain   that   had   fallen   recently,   so   it   was   each   man   or   woman   for   themselves.      Laurie   obviously   likes   crossing streams   as   he   crossed   over   numerous   times.      Tonya   was   determined   to   only   cross   once,   so   had   to   do   some   acrobatics   to   get   over any   hurdles   in   her   path!   The   rest   followed   me   as   they   trusted   that   I   could   get   them   over   the   raging   torrent   without   getting   wet!     Mission accomplished!!! After   that,   it   was   plain   sailing   into   Hebden,   where,   low   and   behold   there   was   a   tea   shop   serving   very   nice   coffee,   tea   and   cakes.     Now,   I   am   not   one   for   tea   shops   –   she   says   tongue   in   cheek,   but   my   party   wanted   to   go   in.      So,   we   all   had   coffee   and   some   cakes too.   John   seemed   to   take   longer   than   most   to      place   his   order   as   he   was   very   intrigued   about   “Tart   of   the   Day”   It   turned   out   to   be Lemon which he thoroughly enjoyed. Having   dragged   everyone   away   from   the   cakes,   goats,   chickens   and   guinea   pigs   etc.,   we   then   walked   down   to   the   River   Wharfe and back to Grassington via the very spectacular Linton Falls.

Cream Tea at Carol’s – 9th July 2017

It was a great turnout for our event with forty two of us including your hosts. Carol   had   pulled   all   the   stops   out   to   make   sure   there   was   plenty   to   eat   and   set   everything   out   with   Jean's   help.   I   contributed   with   my very first attempt at scone making. I hope all that ate them survived the experience! Glynis   and   Sue   arrived   after   9   am   and   took   the   long   walkers   away   without   delay   as   they   had   to   ensure   that   they   were   back   before the rest of us scoffed all the grub before they got back. I   lead   the   tea   shop   walk   to   Goit   Stock   without   any   incidents,   and   it   was   good   to   see   the   kids   enjoying   it.   We   got   back   a   little   earlier than planned but there was plenty for everyone when the long walkers returned too. It was a beautiful sunny afternoon and I think that everyone enjoyed it. Peter

Elsecar - 16th July.

After   negotiating   major   roadworks   on   exiting   the   M1   at   Junction   36,   14   members   (Pam   Alderson,   Jennie   Pearson,   Robin   Myers, Hazel   and   Bill   Kimberley,   Marge,   Mel   Stockdale,   Jonathan   Myers,   Carol   Jobling,   Lawrie, Terry   Doolan,   Pat Appleyard,   David   Shaw and Terry Smith (walk leader)) set off from Elsecar Park car park at 09:45 for a six miles walk around the Elsecar/Wentworth area. Weather   was   pleasantly   warm   -   and   got   warmer   as   time   went   by. Although   there   was   a   slight   threat   of   rain   at   the   outset   we   were blessed with fine weather throughout. The   terrain   of   the   walk   took   in   a   mixture   of   surfaces   -   woodland   paths,   open   fields   and   pavement/roadside   whilst   passing   through Harley and Wentworth villages. Everybody   seemed   to   enjoy   the   walk   and   was   not   tempted   to   divert   to   the   Elsecar   Heritage   Centre   which   was   nearby.   However some   individuals   were   tempted   to   buy   some   rather   delicious   ice   creams   on   sale   in   Elsecar   Park   at   the   end   of   the   walk   -   which finished at 13:00. Many   thanks   are   expressed   to   Mel   for   acting   as   my   "tail   end   Charlie"   and   Lawrie   for   finding   a   very   pleasant   lunch   stop   in   the grounds of an ancient church in Wentworth. Terry Smith

The Medium Walk – Sunday 6 August 2017

Location: Long Marston Leader: Lizzie Lowe Walkers: Pam, Ian, Glynis, David Shaw, Carol Joblin, Laurie, Jane Elliott Weather: Dry, warmish, a bit cloudy and a bit windy We   parked   near   the   Sun   Inn   in   Long   Marston,   then   walked   along   a   couple   of   streets   to   find   the   Village   Hall   hidden   down   a   secret alley   between   some   unremarkable   houses.         We   followed   a   path   to   the   right   of   the   Village   Hall;   this   meandered   beside   fields   and hedges   to   emerge   onto   a   lane.         Turning   left,   we   followed   the   lane,   eventually   turning   right   onto   a   field   path   that   led   us   down   to Stubbing   Gate.         Having   gone   over   a   tiny   stream,   we   then   headed   uphill   between   fields   to   Heulaugh   Grange   Farm.      (Three   weeks earlier,   this   path   had   been   well-nigh   impassable;   overgrown   with   weeds   and   crops.         I’d   come   prepared   today,   with   secateurs.        But   delightfully,   it   had   all   been   cleared   since   Glynis   and   I   did   the   recce.         No   need   for   secateurs   –   Glynis’s   complaint   to   the Ramblers’ Association and the York footpath officer had obviously paid off!).      At   the   far   side   of   the   farm   grounds   we   came   to   a   lane   where   we   turned   right.         (There   was   a   bloated   dead   sheep   here   on   the recce   day,   but   that   too   had   been   dealt   with   –   Glynis’s   complaints   are   effective!).         When   the   lane   ended   we   turned   right   again, uphill   a   bit   then   downward   again   to   find   a   sheltered   dell   where   we   ate   our   elevensies   in   the   sunshine   (or   shade,   depending   on personal   preference).         Refreshed,   we   continued   around   the   edge   of   Nova   Scotia   Wood,   to   find   a   clear   path   that   led   us   eventually to   the   Chequers   Inn   in   the   village   of   Bilton.         We   wandered   through   this   apparently   deserted   village,   admiring   the   elegant   houses but   puzzled   by   the   lack   of   people.         We   crossed   the   B1224   by   the   ancient   church   of   St.   Helen   (Norman),   then   took   the   small   road opposite, which eventually became another long clear lane to Tockwith. At      Tockwith,   we   turned   right   along   the   road   –   sadly   the   verges   were   so   overgrown   that   we   had   to   walk   on   the   tarmac.         Some   of us   ate   our   lunch   whilst   sitting   on   the   verge   –   others   pressed   on   along   the   road   to   the   Obelisk   which   commemorates   the   Battle   of Marston   Moor   in   1644   (Oliver   Cromwell   won!).         At   the   Obelisk   we   were   reunited,   and   we   all   sat   on   the   steps   for   a   while,   admiring the view and pondering about the Civil War so long ago. Then   it   was   onwards   again.      We   didn’t   even   try   the   footpath   that   runs   behind   the   village   of   Long   Marston,   because   it   had   been completely   overgrown   with   nettles   on   our   recce   day   and   we   had   no   faith   that   it   would   have   been   cleared.         Instead,   we   amused ourselves   by   keeping   to   the   sidewalk   and   staring   into   people’s   gardens   as   we   passed   through   the   village.         At   the   far   end,   we found the cars, cast off our boots and headed for the pub. Lizzie Lowe

LONG CREAM TEA WALK – 9TH JULY2017

LEADERS:                  GLYNIS & SUE W WALKERS:                  JILL, ANDY, MELANIE, IAN, ROBIN AND ANGELA Eight   of   us   left   Morley   to   rendezvous   at   Carol   Humphries   house   at   Ryecroft   for   the   Long/Cream   Tea   Walk.      We   set   off   walking promptly   on   arrival   as   we   had   a   deadline   to   be   back   at   Carol’s   house   at   around   1400,   so   as   not   to   miss   out   on   the   scones,   jam and cream! We   set   off   at   a   good   pace   across   the   fields   to   Barcroft   avoiding   any   rampaging   young   cows   on   the   way.      From   the   village,   we headed   up   on   to   Brow   Moor   where   we   had   lovely   views   looking   down   on   to   Haworth   in   the   distance   and   the   Worth   Valley   where we   could   see   the   steam   trains   going   by. After   coffee,   we   dropped   down   to   Mount   Pleasant   Farm   where   we   were   greeted   by   some unusual   hens   –   totally   white   with   fluffy   feathers   round   their   feet!   Then   it   was   uphill   again   and   onto   Black   Moor   heading   towards Denholme.      We   came   across   this   big   black   bull   in   one   of   the   fields   and   he   was   looking   very   depressed!   On   the   gate   to   his   field, there was a sign saying “Beware Gay Bull in field”. He certainly did not look gay to us. After   Denholme,   we   followed   an   old   disused   railway   line   to   Hewenden   Reservoir   where   we   stopped   for   lunch.      Again,   it   was beautiful   and   very   tranquil   looking   down   onto   the   water   in   the   gorgeous   sunshine.      From   there,   we   walked   along   the   Hewenden Viaduct,   then   through   Goitstock   Woods   which   were   lovely   and   shady.   The   waterfalls   were   overflowing   with   water   and   some   boys were   tombstoning   into   the   pools   –   must   be   mad!! After   taking   lots   of   photos,   we   headed   towards   Carol’s   house   for   our   cream   tea where we met up with the others who had done the short walk plus some members who had come for a ride out. Glynis,   myself   and   all   in   our   group   would   like   to   put   in   writing   our   thanks   to   Carol   and   Peter   for   putting   on   a   lovely   cream   tea, gorgeous weather in a lovely setting and amongst friends.

Wensleydale Wander (Long Walk). 13/08/2017

Walkers-   Ian(Leader), Anne   &   Chris   Gott,   Sue   Williams,   Ros   ,Sue   Lund,   Robin,   Phil   &   Cyn, Andrew   Sanderson,   John   Hamlin,   Jill   & Andy, Lawrie, David Shaw, Roger & Elise & Bailey the Dog. A   lovely   sunny   day   &   an   easier   grade   walk   brought   about   a   decent   turnout   of   17   walkers.   We   left   the   market   town   of   Leyburn   via 'The Shawl', a lovely stretch of high ground once frequented by Mary Queen of Scots. After   the   Shawl,   we   dropped   down   into   the   valley   and   through   Gillfield   Wood,   where   we   took   a   coffee   break   by   a   stream   &   re- arranged   the   park   bench   so   Anne   could   sit   in   the   sunshine.   Our   next   destination   was   the   pleasant   village   of   Preston   under   Scar, before   heading   downhill   to   cross   the   Wensleydale   Railway.   Ros   gave   us   facts   about   the   tourist   line,   which   runs   along   the   valley, and   as   a   train   came   past,   we   all   waved   madly,   just   like   The   Railway   Children.   Now   we   made   our   way   into   Redmire   village   and passing the old 12th century church of St. Mary's with its lovely open bell tower. We   took   lunch   beside   the   River   Ure,   and   did   a   short   de-tour   to   visit   Redmire   Falls,   where   our   view   was   blocked   by   two   large objects,   but   the   young   ladies   moved   to   allow   us   a   photo   opportunity.   Heading   back   eastwards,   we   encountered   several   tight   stiles, which   caused   a   few   problems   for   Roger   &   Elise's   dog,   Bailey,   who   was   very   well   behaved   all   day.   Lawrie   had   brought   some   carrots along in case we passed some horses & he got his chance as we walked through a field of them, Sue Lund joined him. A   nice   cool   stretch   through   a   wood   brought   us   to   the   grand   mansion   house   Bolton   Hall,   butler   Jackson   was   going   to   make   us   tea, but   we   needed   to   press   on   with   the   walk. After   leaving   the   grounds   of   the   hall,   we   entered   the   pretty   village   of   Wensley   and   whilst admiring   a   lovely   floral   garden,   Elise   almost   lost   her   hair   to   a   contraption   on   the   back   of   a   tractor.   After   a   slight   climb   out   of   the village,   several   fields   were   crossed   before   a   final   'sting   in   the   tail'   was   reached,   in   the   form   of   an   old   sunken   track,   which   was   quite a challenge near the end of the walk. Everyone seemed to enjoy the day & quite deserved our drinkie in the pub.

August 20th Silkstone.

Twenty   people   set   out   on   the   Silkstone   walk.   The   walk   was   a   themed   walk,   which   was   based   around   the   Husker   Pit   disaster   in which   26   children,   who   worked   in   the   mine,   died   in   tragic   circumstances.   It   took   in   various   sites   and   monuments   relating   the   history of   the   disaster   along   with   other   sites   of   historical   interest.   We   also   visited   some   interesting   gardens   and   buildings   and   the   'Old   Pot House   Hamlet   ‘,   from   which   I   hope   to   arrange   tea   shop   walk   in   the   future.   The   weather   was   good,   the   group   were   nice,   and everybody seemed to have had an enjoyable time including Bailey the dog and 7 year old Ethan, who did really well. Bob Thompson.

Marsden Medium Walk. - 03/09/2017

Walkers   -   (16)      Ian   Pickering(Leader)   ,Sue   Williams,   Robin   ,Eileen,   Melanie,   Lizzie,   Jo,   David   Shaw,   Laurie,   President   Pete,   Sue Lund, John Hamlin, Beryl & the three Carols, Humphries, Jobling & Summers. The   day   didn't   bode   well   at   first,   as   the   walk   leader   gave   meeting   directions   to   Marsden   railway   station   &   then   for   some   unknown reason proceeded to park at the station, but the wrong station ,in the wrong town of Slaithwaite. Anyway   we   got   going   along   the   Huddersfield   narrow   canal   to   the   Standedge Tunnel,   through   which   the   canal   runs   underground   for approx.   4   Miles.   Here   we   met   a   lady   from   the   Canals   &   Rivers   trust,   who   couldn't   give   us   much   information   about   the   tunnel,   but did   try   to   sell   us   'Trust'   membership   (No   chance).   As   we   walked   through   a   new   Nature   Reserve,   we   found   a   pair   of   glasses   on   a picnic   table   &   Carol   Summers   tried   them   on   and   hey-ho   she   could   see   through   them,   and   a   bonus   was,   the   colour   matched   her fleece. After   crossing   the   lovely   old   packhorse   bridge   at   Eastergate,   we   headed   onto   the   moor   via   Willykay   Clough,   where   a   coffee break was taken. Next   we   climbed   the   moor   and   gained   an   extra   walker,   in   the   shape   of   a   Mouse   which   was   running   up   the   path   in   front   of   us.   We joined   the   Pennine   Way   and   followed   it   to   the   trig   point   at   Standedge   and   gained   a   very   strong   wind   blowing   across   the   ridge. Lunch   was   taken   besides   Redbrook   Reservoir   but   we   quickly   became   lunch   ourselves   after   being   eaten   by   a   swarm   of   hungry flies.   Following   the   lunch   break,   I   had   planned   a   naughty   little   'sting   in   the   tail’   up   the   steep   side   of   Pule   Hill,   which   is   a   tough   climb but   only   short.   It   was   all   downhill   now,   along   the   top   of   Pule   Hill   &   passed   the   WW2   monument   ,   before   descending   steeply   back   to the   Standedge   Tunnel   once   again.   To   finish,   we   strolled   back   along   the   canal   to   the   cars,   but   not   before   the   Canals   &   Rivers   Trust woman tried to extract more money out of us (still no chance).

St Aidan's short Walk.  15/10/2017

Walkers:-   Ian   Pickering   (Leader),   Jonathan   Myers,   Phil   &   Cyn,   Roger   &   Ethan   &   Bailey   the   Dog.   Margaret   Bye, Anne   Cooper,   Jill   & Andy,   Andrew   Sanderson,   Pat   Smith,   Rita   &   Brian,   Sonia   Hamlin,   President   Pete   &   Carol.   Mary   Kennedy,   Jenny   Pearson,   Terry, Ken, David Lyon, Bill &Hazel, Alan Redgrove, Eileen, Denise, Hazel, Jane Elliot & Jackie. The   very   good   October   weather   helped   a   good   turnout   for   this   very   nice   local   wander.   After   filling   the   car   park   at   Fleet   Lane,   we headed   off   through   Lemonroyd   Marina,   which   was   full   of   narrow   boats.   Following   a   steady   stroll   along   the   River   Aire,   we   had   a coffee   break   at   Caroline   Bridge,   where   I   had   laid   some   lovely   flat   boulders   to   sit   on.   Shortly   after   the   break,   we   had   to   say   Bye   to Margaret   for   a   while,   as   she   had   left   her   walking   pole   back   at   the   boulders   &   returned   with   young   Bill.   A   narrow   path   along   an   Ox bow   lake   brought   us   to   Woodend   &   we   picked   up   a   bridleway   that   led   to   the   nature   reserve   at   St Aidan's.   Lunch   was   taken   besides the   visitor   centre   &   Oddball,   the   large   dragline   from   the   old   mine.   An   adventurous   swimmer   in   the   lake   entertained   us   before   we headed   up   a   small   hill. The   walk   along   the   top   gave   us   some   lovely   views   of   the   whole   reserve   &   we   watched   some   Kestrels   looking for   lunch.   Making   our   way   through   the   waterways   &   reed   beds   we   arrived   at   a   causeway   to   cross   one   of   the   lakes   and   take   us   back towards the river. A steady plod along the perimeter of the reserve finished off the walk on a lovely sunny day. Ian

Medium walk Sunday 5th November 2017

Leader: Robin Myers. Walkers,   Jonathan   Myers,   Margaret   Bye,   Ann   Cooper,   Ros   Smith,   Denise   Smith,   Tonya   Smith,   Lizzy   Low,   Pam   Pawson,   Phil   & Cynthia   Hirst,   Sue   Williams,   Joyce   Briggs,   Val   Chadwick,   Glynis   Holmes,   Beryl   Kirk,   Sue   Lund,   Mel   Stockdale,   Carol   Jobling,   Pat Appleyard,   John   &   Sonia   Hamlin,   Jill   &Andie   McFarlane,   Pat   Smith,   Bev   Gaunt,   David   Lyon,   Jane   Elliott,   Carol   Petrie,   Pat   Ashby, Andrew Sanderson, Laurie Hutchinson, Jenny Pearson and Linda McLoughlin. The   weather   was   wonderful,   bright   sunny   and   warm   for   the   time   of   year.      I   could   not   believe   it   when   33   walkers   arrived   at   Morrison’s car park. On   arrival   for   the   walk   we   parked   at   Boothwood   Reservoir   car   park   and   set   off   gently   climbing   towards   Rishworth   Moor   where   we encountered   our   first   obstacle,   a   six   foot   wall   with   a   stone   step   style   built   into   it.   With   a   great   deal   of   help   from   Andie   we   all managed   to   get   over   it.   As   we   got   higher   reaching   the   ridge   we   were   rewarded   with   panoramic   views   over   the   valley   towards Baitings and Ryeburn reservoirs and further down the valley, the village of Rishworth. At this point the moor slopes steeply downhill and as we descended I heard some sort of words about a trolley. The   muttering   got   louder   when   we   had   to   negotiate   a   stream   and   deep   mud   at   a   field   gate.   Still   undeterred,   and   with   a   brave   face,   I continued on regardless. We   took   elevenses   on   the   dot   in   a   small   and   then   continued   down   towards   Baitings   Reservoir   wall   which   we   crossed   before   turning right   into   the   wooded   valley   of   Ryeburn   Reservoir.   This   area   is   a   delight   however   at   this   point,   my   first   mistake,   I   was   so   busy talking to David Lyon we missed the gate and path for about fifty yards before the thick mud stopped us. As we made our way back David’s foot got stuck in the mud and he fell covering his trousers in thick mud. (Sorry David). The   dark   muttering   about   a   trolley   were   much   louder   now.   Grimly   we   continued   through   woods   and   then   took   at   some   picnic   tables at the end of the reservoir. We   crossed   the   reservoir   wall   and   began   to   make   our   way   up   hill   towards   the   valley   ridge   crossing   fields   and   passing      a   17th century house at Upper Cockcroft. The   walk   continued   in   a   big   half   circle   with   great   views   all   the   way   but   it      was   here   I   made   my   second   mistake,   I   picked   the   wrong path   down   the   side   of   a   house   and   we   had   to   turn   round   after   about   200      yards.   By   now   I   was   really   worried,   the   trolley   brigade were in full swing. We finally arrived back at the car park. All   joking   aside   I   think   it   was   marvellous   that   33   people   turned   up   for   my   walk   and   I   thank   all   of   them.   I   think   everyone   had   a   great day.

The Short Walk – Sunday 19 November 2017

Location - Castleford Leader – Lizzie Lowe Walkers   –   Bill   &   Hazel,   Peter   &   Carol,   Carol   Joblin,   Pat   &   Graham,   Eileen,   Sonia,   Laurie,   Sue   Lund,   Ian   &   Diane,   Phil   &   Cyn,      Jane, Glynis, Terry Smith, Pat Pitts, Rita & Brian, Marj Rapley, Terry Doolan, David Lyon, Ken, Jonathan, Beryl, Robin, Alan, Jill & Andy Weather – a bright frosty day We   parked   behind   Wilco’s   in   Castleford,   then   set   forth   across   the   Millennium   Bridge,   over   the   River   Aire   onto   Duck   Island.         Back streets   led   us   to   the   main   road,   then   left,   to   cross   a   road   bridge   over   the Aire   and   Calder   Navigation.         Here   we   turned   left   along   the river   bank,   soon   arriving   at   the   confluence   of   the   rivers Aire   and   Calder.         We   took   a   right,   onto   a   path   by   the   River Aire.         This   took us   past   the   Boat   Inn,   to   Allerton   Bywater.         Here   a   minor   diversion   led   us   around   some   buildings,   then   back   to   the   river   bank,   and onward, past various lakes.    We perched on the flood bank to have our elevensies. After   the   final   lake,   we   turned   right   onto   a   bridleway.         A   little   further   on,   we   took   a   minor   path   right,   to   walk   beside   a   lake   then upward,   through   a   gate,   to   what   was   once   a   railway   line.         It’s   now   ‘The   Lines’   –   a   combined   cycle   route   and   footpath.         We   turned right,   following The   Lines   for   a   couple   of   miles,   until   we   came   to   new   houses   on   the   far   side   of Allerton   Bywater.         We   had   lunch   in   a little park here, some of us sitting on a metal bench around a tree, others perched on a wall.   The local folk looked worried! We    left    the    park    via    Beeston    Way,    arriving    in   Allerton    Bywater    right    opposite    the    delightful    delicatessen/tea    room    ‘Samuel Valentine’s’   –   but   we   didn’t   stop   there.         Instead,   we   crossed   the   main   road   to   Robinson   Street,   then   took   an   alley   which   led   us   back to   the   Boat   Inn.         Then   we   turned   left   to   retrace   our   steps   along   the   riverside   to   Castleford.         By   the   Millennium   Bridge,   we   found   a functioning flour mill – and it had a tea room.   Some of us went in, to sample its wares before we headed for home.  
Leaders; Sue Williams and Mel Stockdale Walkers; Jill and Andy MacFarlane, John Hamlin, Glynis Holmes, Laurie Hutchinson, Ian Pickering. Only   seasoned   walkers   would   have   turned   out   on   such   an   unpromising   foggy,   damp   morning.   We   set   off   from Morley   hoping   that   the   fog   would   lift   by   the   time   we   parked   the   cars   at   Hetton   but   it   was   not   to   be.   The   leaders   set off   up   the   walled   tracks   of   the   Dales   High   Way   and   Cross   Lane   at   a   cracking   pace   -with   visibility   so   poor   there were   no   distractions.   We   had   to   imagine   the   views   over   to   Ingleborough   as   we   navigated   the   large   field   towards Long   Hill   and   it   was   difficult   to   persuade   Laurie   that   Winterburn   reservoir   even   existed.   Some   of   us   were   in   more   of a fog than others! It   was   unseasonably   warm   as   we   slogged   blindly   up   to   Weets   top   causing   some   disrobing   stops.   At   least   we   saw the trig point and Ian was able to add the photo to his collection. A   breeze   started   to   clear   some   of   the   mist   at   last   as   we   stopped   for   lunch   under   Sue’s   windswept   umbrella   trees and snatches of scenery appeared. Unfortunately this also lowered the temperature so all the gear went back on. By   the   time   we   passed   Know   Bank   there   were   even   some   hints   of   blue   sky.   On   the   way   back   down   the   tracks   it was   possible   to   appreciate   some   of   the   incredible   landscape   and   much   to   the   leaders   relief,   Winterburn   was   where it was supposed to be. We all agreed that this walk needs to be done again in better weather to reveal its full glories.

Walk Report for January 8th 2017

The Short Walk – Sunday 19 February 2017

Leader – Lizzie Lowe Walkers   –   Julie   Jowett   (returning   after   long   absence),   Colin   and Alison   Mortimer   (potential   new   members),   Denise Robson,   Sonia,   Jenny,   David   Lyon,   Jonathan,   Pat Ashby,   Hazel   Marshall   and   her   dog,   Pat   Pitts,   Pat   and   Graham Smith,   Bev,   Robin,   David   Shaw,   Lesley,   Val   Chadwick,   Beryl,   Rita   and   Brian,   Gavin,   Pauline, Terry   Doolan,   Bill   and Hazel Location – Pudsey Weather – mild for the time of year, and mostly dry The   walk   began   in   School   Street,   Pudsey.         We   meandered   through   back   alleys   and   quiet   suburban   streets,   across Queens   Park   then   onto   Owlcotes   Lane.         This   led   us   downwards,   across   muddy   fields   until   we   were   nearly   at   the Ring   Road.         We   then   went   upwards   again,   along   a   walled   lane,   emerging   on   a   main   road.         We   crossed,   and   went down   Bradley   Lane,   turning   left   just   before   Moorhouse   Place,   then   right   to   descend   to   Tyersal   Beck.         Here   we found three donkeys and some convenient rocks on which to sit and have elevensies. Here   we   left   suburbia   behind   us,   turning   right   to   follow   a   track   upwards   through   patchy   woodland,   eventually arriving   at   the   ancient Tyersal   Hall   at   the   top   of   the   hill.        Turning   left   here   we   followed   a   muddy   track   downwards   to a   stream.         We   crossed   the   stream   and   ascended   to   a   broad   track   (different   coloured   mud   here).        At   this   point   we noticed   we   had   mislaid   Gavin.        After   some   confusion   Bill   and   Robin   retrieved   him,   and   we   all   turned   left   along   the track,   passing   through   Black   Carr   Woods.         Convenient   benches   provided   a   fairly   comfortable   lunch   stop.         Two horses were frightened by us and nearly threw their riders off – one of the riders accused us of hiding behind trees! Downwards   again   to   Pudsey   Beck,   then   over   two   bridges,   to   turn   right   along   a   beckside   path.         A   sharp   left   to   go up   a   steep   track   to   the   Bankhouse   Inn;   another   left   along   a   track   just   before   the   pub   car   park,   then   a   right,   to   a path   upwards   across   a   field.         Through   a   remarkably   narrow   gap   stile   into   a   narrow   ginnel   -   this   led   us   downhill,   to regain   the   streets   of   Pudsey.        A   few   more   ginnels   and   we   were   back   the   other   end   of   School   Street   –   all   fairly   tired after the many ups and downs of this varied walk. Lizzie Lowe

Medium Walk to Bramhope 5

th

 March 2017

Leader: - Glynis Holmes. Walkers: - Pat & Graham, Pam, Bev, Jonathan, Ian, John & Sonia, Robin, Pat A. Carol and Peter met us there. We   set   off   on   a   bright   morning   from   Golden Acre   Park.   The   first   part   of   the   walk   was   along   to   Pauls   Pond   where   the swans   and   ducks   were   being   antisocial   and   stayed   in   the   reeds   furthest   away   from   us.   This   part   of   the   walk   was good   underfoot   so   were   made   swift   progress   to   Grag   Farm   (The   Care   for   Life   centre)   where   we   had   our   elevenses on a grassy area by the footpath. I’d   warned   the   group   that   the   going   got   very   muddy   from   here   and   Pat,   Graham   and   Pam   had   planned   to   leave   us   at this   point   and   retrace   their   steps   back   to   Golden Acre.   We’d   just   finished   our   snap   when   it   started   to   rain   so   we   said our fare wells, donned the waterproofs and carried on to Bramhope. A   Llama   gave   us   a   snooty   look   as   we   walked   past   his   field   and   onwards   through   the   old   tips   left   from   the   building   of the railway tunnel. We were soon at Bramhope where we sat in the park shelter as it was still raining on and off. The   rain   was   getting   heavier   and   the   cloud   was   low   so   unfortunately   we   didn’t   get   the   views   across   from   the   Ebor way   we   had   had   on   the   walk   over.   We   just   got   more   mud;   after   24hours   of   non-stop   rain   over   Friday/Saturday   the paths were very squelchy and there was talk of me getting the trolley award. Cheek!! I   decided   to   cut   the   slurry   filled   Bank   Top   lane   out   so   we   came   down   Arthington   Road   and   joined   the   footpath   to Lineham   Farm   Donkey   Sanctuary.   We   discovered   Ian   needed   to   go   back   to   Specsavers   as   he   thought   the   donkeys were pigs! The sheep were pigs! Everything looked like a pig! We   headed   off   down   Swan   Lane   and   along   to   Eccup   Whin   Woods   where   I   had   to   call   Pat   A   back   as   she   was heading   down   a   path   in   to   a   swamp   created   by   the   very   wet   winter.   Soon   we   were   back   in   to   Golden Acre   where   the Canada   Geese   were   squawking   and   strutting   their   stuff.   Spring   is   on   its   way   and   let’s   hope   it’s   a   dry   one.      I   was really   tempted   to   nip   in   the   café   as   they   do   nice   scones   here   but   we   did   look   like   the   creatures   from   the   black   lagoon so   we   decided   to   head   straight   home.      We’d   walked   8.3   miles   in   good   company,   shame   about   the   mud   and   the weather but that’s winter walking in Great Britain. Baa Humbug!!

The Long Walk – Sunday 12 March 2017

Location: Barwick in Elmet Leader: Lizzie Lowe Walkers: Ian, Robin, David Shaw, Sonia, Sue Williams, Andy and Jill, Melanie, Peter and Carol Weather: Unexpectedly warm and sunny The   walk   began   at   the   Black   Swan   Public   House   in   Barwick   in   Elmet.         The   weather   forecasters   had   told   us   we would be cold and wet, so we were wrapped up cosily. We   began   by   walking   through   the   pub’s   car   park   and   taking   an   alleyway   that   led   us   past   ancient   earthworks   into Meadow   View.         Passing   various   bits   of   suburbia,   we   emerged   onto   Potterton   Lane   and   then   endured   a   bit   of   road walking until, after twists and turns, we found the A64.   Having   crossed   this   busy   road,   we   turned   right   to   find   a   stile   that   led   us   to   more   peaceful   places   –   some   fields,   then a   long   track   called   Mangrill   Lane.        This   took   us   to   the Thorner/Bramham   Road.         We   turned   right,   and   went   downhill, eventually   crossing   the   road   to   take   a   footpath   down   to   Wothersome   Lake.         After   crossing   some   rather   unsteady stepping   stones   over   a   stream,   we   climbed   to   a   ledge   where   we   sat   with   our   elevensies.         The   sun   was   out,   and   we took off a layer or two of clothing. Onward   –   left,   then   after   a   mile   or   so,   right   -   we   stumbled   through   muddy   woods   on   a   variety   of   rutted   tracks.         We reached   Pompocali   in   time   for   lunch,   sitting   atop   what   are   rumoured   to   be   Roman   remains.         More   clothing   came   off; it was getting actively hot! Full   of   sandwiches,   we   proceeded   past   the   ruins   of   Scarcroft   Mill,   along   a   stony   track,   then   across   a   couple   of   fields to   reach   Thorner   Lane.         Turning   left,   we   followed   the   lane   uphill   then   took   a   stile   on   the   right   into   a   field   full   of lunching   walkers   (not   very   communicative   folk   so   we   don’t   know   where   they   were   from).         We   passed   some interesting   Georgian   houses,   then   took   an   alleyway   that   became   a   lane,   crossed   some   stiles,   descending   and ascending   muddy   tracks   and   emerging   in   Thorner   itself.         Sadly   we   found   no   ice-cream   vans   or   shops   –   we   really were getting very warm indeed. Uphill   out   of   Thorner   -   Kirkfield   Lane   then   Ellerker   Lane,   then   Saw   Wood   –   and   we   were   back   then   playing   the dangerous   ‘Cross   the   A64’   game.         We   all   survived,   and   descended   to   a   beck   which   we   followed   through   many   a field   till   it   was   time   to   stop   for   an   afternoon   rest.         The   beck’s   waters   twinkled   in   the   sunlight   –   unbelievably   for   early March.   It   would   have   been   nice   to   finish   on   that   agreeable   track   by   the   beck,   but   alas,   we   had   another   muddy   uphill scramble   to   get   back   to   Barwick.         Very   hot   and   sweaty,   we   returned   to   our   cars   at   around   2.30pm.         Barwick’s tearoom and ice-cream shop were firmly shut, so we headed home. The   lovely   weather   was   a   real   bonus   –   I   wonder   if   the   forecasters   will   apologise   for   getting   their   predictions   so wrong? Lizzie Lowe

Lothersdale - Medium Walk 05/02/2017

Walkers(15).    -Ian    Pickering(Leader)    ,Lizzie,    Sue    Williams,    Glynis,    David    Shaw,    Ros,   Angela    Phipps    ,Andrew Sanderson, Laurie, Pat Appleyard, Maddie Burrows, Robin, John Hamlin, Phil & Cyn As   we   parked   up   in   the   Craven   village   of   Lothersdale   ,there   was   a   few   disgruntled   faces   as   all   we   could   see   was hills.   Shortly   after   setting   off   we   were   heading   up   one   of   these   hills,   which   certainly   warmed   us   up   on   a   chilly morning. We   joined   the   Pennine   Way   and   continued   to   climb   steadily   to   reach   the   summit   point   of   Pinhaw   Beacon.   We   took   a well-earned   coffee   break   here   and   enjoyed   some   stunning   views   across   the   Dales,   as   well   as   been   joined   by   a   few excitable   dogs. A   welcome   downhill   stretch   was   now   encountered,   as   we   followed   the   Pennine   Way   across Thornton Moor.   My   warning   of   a   very   slippery   boardwalk   across   a   bog   caused   some   cautious   walking,   but   as   we   reached   the end of the obstacle, Glynis took a tumble into the mud, luckily no harm done apart from mucky kecks.  After   strolling   through   Elslack   village,   we   headed   up   hill   to   the   nice   little   Elslack   Reservoir,   where   we   took   lunch   and repaired   Lizzie's   feet   &   boots   after   they   had   fallen   apart. A   steady   climb   through   Standrise   Plantation   gave   us   some lovely   views   across   the   Craven   dales,   before   emerging   into   a   moors   road,   where   Mrs   Applepie   came   out   of   the woods   with   a   bright   orange   ball   she   had   stolen   from   a   dog,   who   is   probably   still   looking   for   his   toy.   The   last   climb   of the day was over Ransable Moor, before picking up the Pennine Way again back to the finish. An enjoyable, although rather tough walk in decent weather, to a rarely visited area.

Pendle Hill  (Long Walk)09/04/2017

Walkers   :-   Ian   Pickering   (Leader)   ,   Denise   Smith,   Sue   Williams,   Tonya,   Joyce   Briggs,   Glynis,   David   Shaw,   Angela Phipps,   Jill   & Andy,   Laurie   ,   John   Hamlin,   Carol   &   President   Pete. Also   joining   us   for   a   while   was   Ian's   friend   &   local lad Richard & his dog Alfie. Shorts   &   t-shirts   were   required   as   we   set   off   in   glorious   sunshine   from   Pendleton   Village.   Shortly   after   leaving   the village   we   were   on   the   up,   heading   towards   Nick   of   Pendle,   passing   en-route   a   Ski   Slope,   skiing   in   lovely   sunshine didn't   seem   right,   but   it   is   a   dry   run.   The   Nick   of   Pendle   is   a   gap   in   the   fell   ridge,   from   where   we   treated   to   wonderful views across the Ribble Valley to Clitheroe. After   a   coffee   break,   we   continued   over   Apronfull   Hill   and   Black   Hill,   before   entering   a   lovely   little   valley   known   as Ogden   Clough.   We   now   followed   a   paved   path   across   Barley   Moor   towards   the   summit   of   Pendle   Hill,   it   was   at   this point   Joyce   started   to   feel   unwell,   but   Nurse   Tonya   gave   her   a   magic   potion,   that   tasted   disgusting   but   seemed   to help for a while. The   summit   was   busy   with   people,   but   we   managed   to   take   over   the   trig   point   for   group   photos,   which   looked   like   it included   several   of   the   local   Witches.   Leaving   the   windy   summit   plateau,   we   headed   downhill   &   took   lunch,   before heading   across   Downham   Moor,   where   the   weather   started   to   change   &   it   got   rather   chilly.   Joyce   had   another   dizzy spell   &   got   cramp,   but   was   revived   after   a   bit   of   treatment   &   a   sugary   drink,   which   apparently   had   been   found   on   the fell   earlier,   nothing   but   the   best   for   our   members.   Before   heading   south   along   the   valley,   we   paid   a   visit   to   the   farm that   used   in   the   classic   film   'Whistle   down   the   wind’,   but   Jesus   wasn't   in   the   barn.   A   steady   trudge   back   along   the valley passed a couple of lovely old halls, before we returned to Pendleton, thankfully with Joyce in one piece.

The Tea Shop Walk – Sunday 9 April 2017

Leader – Lizzie Lowe Walkers   –   Rita   and   Brian,   Graham   and   Pat   Smith,   Terry   Doolan,   Marg   Rapley,   Trish   Ashby,   Jonathan,   Brenda   Fox, Julie Jowett, Melanie, Sylvia Reece, Hazel Marshall, Jenny, Pauline Ford, Sonia Hamlin Weather – Very warm and sunny Location = Burley in Wharfedale An   unseasonably   hot   day   –   more   like   July   than April.         We   parked   in   the   public   car   park   on   Long   Meadow,   and   set   off uphill   to   the   railway   station.         Here   we   passed   over   a   footbridge,   then   turned   left   along   a   quiet   street   that   soon became   a   stony   track   leading   up   to   Hag   Farm.         Passing   through   the   farmyard   and   some   woods,   we   turned   right along   a   track   leading   more   steeply   uphill.        A   stream   babbled   on   our   left   as   we   climbed.         We   paused   in   a   field   for   a refreshing snack, then ever upward, to the Guisely – Ilkley road. Having   crossed   the   busy   road,   we   took   a   footpath   immediately   opposite   the   one   we’d   just   left,   then   crossed   the stream via some stepping stones, to head upwards along a track that led out onto the moors. And   still   we   climbed,   till   eventually   we   reached   a   stony   path   on   a   ridge.         Here   we   turned   right,   with   some   amazing views   to   keep   us   entertained.         We   followed   the   stony   track   till   we   came   to   a   little   brick   building   resembling   a   bus shelter.         Then   we   started   a   very   gradual   descent,   past   two   farms   which   allegedly   had   distant   views   of   York   Minster (can’t   see   how,   but   one   farm   was   actually   called York   View).        At   a   third   farm   we   turned   left   along   a   level      stony   track.        Soon   we   had   to   turn   left   again   along   an   indistinct   grassy   track   that   led   us   round   a   disused   quarry   to   find   a   narrow track along another ridge – more fab views!   We stopped for some lunch. Onward   again.         Suddenly   the   track   descended   into   a   ravine   where   we   crossed   Coldstone   Beck   via   some   very dodgy   stepping   stones.         It   was   quite   a   scramble   up   the   steep   bank   the   other   side.         But   now   the   climbing   ended.        We   took   a   downward   trail   that   led   us   through   fields   to   a   busy   road.         We   had   only   a   short   walk   beside   the   road,   then we   turned   left   along   Stead   Lane   –   another   stony   track   past   scattered   houses.         After   about   1   km,   we   turned   right through   a   kissing   gate,   and   followed   a   green   path   along   the   valley   –   it   wove   about   a   bit,   and   we   finally   joined   yet another stony track to emerge near Burley station.   We followed the road down into Burley.   Hot   and   tired,   most   of   the   walkers   headed   for   The   Coffee   Station   to   have   their   tea   and   buns.         Some   rebels   went   to the   pub   instead.        And   sadly,   I   had   to   rush   home   –   the   hot   weather   and   the   hills   had   rendered   us   very   slow,   and   I   was too short of time to have a cake on my own tea shop walk.   How sad is that!!

Thixendale Medium Walk 2/4/17

Leader Angela Phipps Walkers       Mel,   Pat   Smith,   Sue   Williams,   Denise   Smith,   Margaret   Bye,   David   Lyons,   Anne   Cooper,   Jill   &   Andy MacFarlane, Pat Pitts, Laurie, Robin, Trish Ashby, Andre & Ros In   spite   of   rain   dances   all   week   to   keep   numbers   down   for   my   first   walk,   the   weather   was   lovely   and   we   made   a decent sized motley crew. We   set   off   from   the   village   hall   west   to   bear   left   onto   Thixen   Dale.   After   a   march   up   Milham   Dale   we   arrived   at Thixendale   Grange   at   the   stoke   of   11   for   coffee.   Some   of   the   group   were   heckled   by   a   friendly   passing   chap   on   a horse & cart wanting to join us for coffee. (So far so good) Refreshed,   we   walked   on   up   to   turn   left   onto   the   Roman   Road   on   the   North   Wolds   Walk.   Before   leaving   the   road   Pat Pitts   was   armed   with   a   copy   of   the   walk   and   intended   to   leave   us   to   cut   the   walk   short   (on   the   condition   she   saved us   some   cake   in   the   Village   Hall   coffee   shop).   Just   as   she   was   about   to   leave   us   our   eccentric   friend   with   the   horse &   cart   was   passing,   and   offered   her   a   lift   which   she   was   very   happy   to   accept.   We   took   photographic   evidence   and waved her off not entirely sure if we would see her again! (One down) The   rest   of   the   group   headed   down   through   the   fields   crossing   Waterloo   Beck   and   admired   the   beautiful   mass   of daffodils   in   the   garden   of   Waterloo   Cottage.   Heading   towards   Kirby   Underdale   we   met   up   with   our   now   best   friend and   chauffeur   who   was   keen   to   tell   us   where   he'd   dropped   Pat   off   and   where   she   was   heading.   (To   bag   our   cakes   at the tea shop we hoped...) We   stopped   in   the   lovely   churchyard   of   the   old   church   at   Kirby   Underdale   for   lunch,   and   a   few   people   explored   the church. Then   it   was   time   for   the   uphill.   Passing   Painsthorpe   Hall,   Ros   was   wishing   she'd   eaten   her   apple   at   lunch   and   not tried   to   eat   in   it   en-route   while   puffing   &   panting!   We   were   also   blessed   with   the   promise   of   some   good   luck   as   a   bird left a present on Laurie's forehead. Luckily Margaret had some wet wipes and cleaned him up. Back   at   the   Roman   Road   we   followed   Pat's   footsteps   down   Worm   Dale,   then   back   onto   Thixen   Dale   following   the Yorkshire   Wolds   Way   back   into   Thixendale   in   time   to   beat   the   black   clouds   that   lurked   menacingly.   (Ian   will   be pleased to know that I managed to miss the hare and pheasant with my camera as is my want.) We were reunited with Pat Pitts in the tea shop and there was enough cake to go round. Counted them out and counted them in. (Phew!)

Peter and Carol’s 9 mile walk on Sunday 4 June 2017 from Gargrave

Present were: - Peter, Carol, Glynis, David Lyons, David Shaw, Angela, Ian, Jenny, Robin and Pat Appleyard. We   set   off   from   the   public   car   park   in   Gargrave   with   a   beautiful   Sunny   morning   to   enter   the   canal   heading   towards Flasby.      All   went   well   until   we   discovered   that   we   had   lost   David   L   who   had   gone   back   to   retrieve   the   poles   he   had abandoned   some   way   back.      Lovely   views   were   to   be   had   of   Flasby   Fell   along   with   Rough   Haw   and   Sharp   Haw.   I did   manage   to   get   us   all   off   track   when   Glynis   wanted   a   ladies’   stop   as   we   all   followed   her   through   a   gate   which   I said   was   the   right   way.   I’d   been   chatting   and   missed   the   turn   so   I   got   some   flack   for   that!      Carol   narrated   historical facts   at   regular   intervals   that   she   hoped   added   to   the   interest   and   I   entertained   with   some   jokes   with   calls   from Glynis of “not to give up my day job” The   leader’s   timing   for   coffee   stop   was   brilliant   for   as   soon   as   we   all   settled   it   tipped   it   down.      We   all   sought   shelter under a large tree until it stopped, but the rest of the time it managed to kept fine. There   were   some   terrific   views   overlooking   the   Aire   Valley   and   Pendle   Hill   beyond.   A   pleasant   two   mile   stroll   along the canal from Stirton brought us back to Gargrave and the car park.

GRASSINGTON WALK REPORT – 11.6.17

LONG WALK WITH A BIT OF A TEA SHOP!!!

LEADER: SUE WILLIAMS WALKERS: CAROL    SUMMERS,    DENISE    SMITH,    TONYA    SMITH,    ANGELA    PHIPPS,    DAVID    SHAW,    ROBIN MYERS, LAURIE HUTCHINSON, JOHN HAMLIN, PAT APPLEYARD On   leaving   the   Visitor   Centre   car   park,   we   headed   up   into   Grassington   itself   where   there   was   a   Farmers’   Market taking   place   (very   tempting   to   stay   put),   but   we   carried   on   regardless.      We   followed   the   Dales   Way   through   the village   and   out   onto   the   moors.      We   branched   off   from   the   Dales   Way   path   and   headed   up   to   “Bare   House”   which   is a derelict farmhouse and was a good place to stop for coffee. After   our   break,   we   then   headed   for   the   old   lead   mines   and   Cupola   Chimney,   which   looks   more   like   the   Leaning Tower   of   Pisa   each   time   I   see   it.      We   had   lunch   there   as   there   was   some   shelter   from   the   wind,   before   heading   down to   Hebden   Beck.      The   beck   was   quite   high   because   of   the   rain   that   had   fallen   recently,   so   it   was   each   man   or woman   for   themselves.      Laurie   obviously   likes   crossing   streams   as   he   crossed   over   numerous   times.      Tonya   was determined   to   only   cross   once,   so   had   to   do   some   acrobatics   to   get   over   any   hurdles   in   her   path!   The   rest   followed me as they trusted that I could get them over the raging torrent without getting wet!  Mission accomplished!!! After   that,   it   was   plain   sailing   into   Hebden,   where,   low   and   behold   there   was   a   tea   shop   serving   very   nice   coffee,   tea and   cakes.      Now,   I   am   not   one   for   tea   shops   –   she   says   tongue   in   cheek,   but   my   party   wanted   to   go   in.      So,   we   all had   coffee   and   some   cakes   too.   John   seemed   to   take   longer   than   most   to      place   his   order   as   he   was   very   intrigued about “Tart of the Day” It turned out to be Lemon which he thoroughly enjoyed. Having   dragged   everyone   away   from   the   cakes,   goats,   chickens   and   guinea   pigs   etc.,   we   then   walked   down   to   the River Wharfe and back to Grassington via the very spectacular Linton Falls.

Cream Tea at Carol’s – 9th July 2017

It was a great turnout for our event with forty two of us including your hosts. Carol   had   pulled   all   the   stops   out   to   make   sure   there   was   plenty   to   eat   and   set   everything   out   with   Jean's   help.   I contributed with my very first attempt at scone making. I hope all that ate them survived the experience! Glynis   and   Sue   arrived   after   9   am   and   took   the   long   walkers   away   without   delay   as   they   had   to   ensure   that   they were back before the rest of us scoffed all the grub before they got back. I   lead   the   tea   shop   walk   to   Goit   Stock   without   any   incidents,   and   it   was   good   to   see   the   kids   enjoying   it.   We   got   back a little earlier than planned but there was plenty for everyone when the long walkers returned too. It was a beautiful sunny afternoon and I think that everyone enjoyed it. Peter

Elsecar - 16th July.

After   negotiating   major   roadworks   on   exiting   the   M1   at   Junction   36,   14   members   (Pam   Alderson,   Jennie   Pearson, Robin   Myers,   Hazel   and   Bill   Kimberley,   Marge,   Mel   Stockdale,   Jonathan   Myers,   Carol   Jobling,   Lawrie,   Terry   Doolan, Pat Appleyard,   David   Shaw   and   Terry   Smith   (walk   leader))   set   off   from   Elsecar   Park   car   park   at   09:45   for   a   six   miles walk around the Elsecar/Wentworth area. Weather   was   pleasantly   warm   -   and   got   warmer   as   time   went   by.   Although   there   was   a   slight   threat   of   rain   at   the outset we were blessed with fine weather throughout. The   terrain   of   the   walk   took   in   a   mixture   of   surfaces   -   woodland   paths,   open   fields   and   pavement/roadside   whilst passing through Harley and Wentworth villages. Everybody   seemed   to   enjoy   the   walk   and   was   not   tempted   to   divert   to   the   Elsecar   Heritage   Centre   which   was nearby.   However   some   individuals   were   tempted   to   buy   some   rather   delicious   ice   creams   on   sale   in   Elsecar   Park   at the end of the walk - which finished at 13:00. Many   thanks   are   expressed   to   Mel   for   acting   as   my   "tail   end   Charlie"   and   Lawrie   for   finding   a   very   pleasant   lunch stop in the grounds of an ancient church in Wentworth. Terry Smith

The Medium Walk – Sunday 6 August 2017

Location: Long Marston Leader: Lizzie Lowe Walkers: Pam, Ian, Glynis, David Shaw, Carol Joblin, Laurie, Jane Elliott Weather: Dry, warmish, a bit cloudy and a bit windy We   parked   near   the   Sun   Inn   in   Long   Marston,   then   walked   along   a   couple   of   streets   to   find   the   Village   Hall   hidden down   a   secret   alley   between   some   unremarkable   houses.         We   followed   a   path   to   the   right   of   the   Village   Hall;   this meandered   beside   fields   and   hedges   to   emerge   onto   a   lane.         Turning   left,   we   followed   the   lane,   eventually   turning right   onto   a   field   path   that   led   us   down   to   Stubbing   Gate.         Having   gone   over   a   tiny   stream,   we   then   headed   uphill between    fields    to    Heulaugh    Grange    Farm.        (Three    weeks    earlier,    this    path    had    been    well-nigh    impassable; overgrown   with   weeds   and   crops.         I’d   come   prepared   today,   with   secateurs.         But   delightfully,   it   had   all   been cleared   since   Glynis   and   I   did   the   recce.         No   need   for   secateurs   –   Glynis’s   complaint   to   the   Ramblers’   Association and the York footpath officer had obviously paid off!).      At   the   far   side   of   the   farm   grounds   we   came   to   a   lane   where   we   turned   right.         (There   was   a   bloated   dead   sheep here   on   the   recce   day,   but   that   too   had   been   dealt   with   –   Glynis’s   complaints   are   effective!).         When   the   lane   ended we   turned   right   again,   uphill   a   bit   then   downward   again   to   find   a   sheltered   dell   where   we   ate   our   elevensies   in   the sunshine   (or   shade,   depending   on   personal   preference).         Refreshed,   we   continued   around   the   edge   of   Nova Scotia   Wood,   to   find   a   clear   path   that   led   us   eventually   to   the   Chequers   Inn   in   the   village   of   Bilton.         We   wandered through   this   apparently   deserted   village,   admiring   the   elegant   houses   but   puzzled   by   the   lack   of   people.         We crossed   the   B1224   by   the   ancient   church   of   St.   Helen   (Norman),   then   took   the   small   road   opposite,   which eventually became another long clear lane to Tockwith. At      Tockwith,   we   turned   right   along   the   road   –   sadly   the   verges   were   so   overgrown   that   we   had   to   walk   on   the tarmac.         Some   of   us   ate   our   lunch   whilst   sitting   on   the   verge   –   others   pressed   on   along   the   road   to   the   Obelisk which   commemorates   the   Battle   of   Marston   Moor   in   1644   (Oliver   Cromwell   won!).         At   the   Obelisk   we   were reunited, and we all sat on the steps for a while, admiring the view and pondering about the Civil War so long ago. Then   it   was   onwards   again.      We   didn’t   even   try   the   footpath   that   runs   behind   the   village   of   Long   Marston,   because it   had   been   completely   overgrown   with   nettles   on   our   recce   day   and   we   had   no   faith   that   it   would   have   been cleared.         Instead,   we   amused   ourselves   by   keeping   to   the   sidewalk   and   staring   into   people’s   gardens   as   we passed through the village.   At the far end, we found the cars, cast off our boots and headed for the pub. Lizzie Lowe

LONG CREAM TEA WALK – 9TH JULY2017

LEADERS:                  GLYNIS & SUE W WALKERS:                  JILL, ANDY, MELANIE, IAN, ROBIN AND ANGELA Eight   of   us   left   Morley   to   rendezvous   at   Carol   Humphries   house   at   Ryecroft   for   the   Long/Cream   Tea   Walk.      We   set off   walking   promptly   on   arrival   as   we   had   a   deadline   to   be   back   at   Carol’s   house   at   around   1400,   so   as   not   to   miss out on the scones, jam and cream! We   set   off   at   a   good   pace   across   the   fields   to   Barcroft   avoiding   any   rampaging   young   cows   on   the   way.      From   the village,   we   headed   up   on   to   Brow   Moor   where   we   had   lovely   views   looking   down   on   to   Haworth   in   the   distance   and the   Worth   Valley   where   we   could   see   the   steam   trains   going   by.   After   coffee,   we   dropped   down   to   Mount   Pleasant Farm   where   we   were   greeted   by   some   unusual   hens   –   totally   white   with   fluffy   feathers   round   their   feet!   Then   it   was uphill   again   and   onto   Black   Moor   heading   towards   Denholme.      We   came   across   this   big   black   bull   in   one   of   the   fields and   he   was   looking   very   depressed!   On   the   gate   to   his   field,   there   was   a   sign   saying   “Beware   Gay   Bull   in   field”.   He certainly did not look gay to us. After   Denholme,   we   followed   an   old   disused   railway   line   to   Hewenden   Reservoir   where   we   stopped   for   lunch.     Again,   it   was   beautiful   and   very   tranquil   looking   down   onto   the   water   in   the   gorgeous   sunshine.      From   there,   we walked   along   the   Hewenden   Viaduct,   then   through   Goitstock   Woods   which